Haida Gwaii Kayak Adventure

About the Experience

Gwaii Haanas was voted the #1 wilderness park destination in North America by National Geographic,” you tell your quizzical friends. “It’s sort of like the Canadian Galapagos,” you try again. But they don’t quite get why you are so moved by these tiny islands scattered off the coast of British Columbia. And really, you don’t blame them. It’s impossible to understand until you have experienced the transformative wonder of this place firsthand.  

For a kayaker like yourself, this little corner of the earth is something of a paradise. Paddling through Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve is an experience unlike any other. You drift through Haida First Nation waterways, passing ancient totem poles that dot the distance. Black bears mosey between the towering trees, while sea lions and slick seals flop at the water’s edge. Here, you are one with the water, and your day is spent upon the surface of the sea – 4-5 hours of paddling each day, gliding through these exquisite, untouched shorelines. The silence is heavy, and heavenly.

At night, when you rest in a tent cast upon the mossy rainforest floor, you can feel the thrum and pulse of this vast, magical place. It is deep, and sure, and in perfect sync with your own wild, happy, heart.

Click here to see the full itinerary!
Haida Gwaii Kayak Adventure

About the Experience

Gwaii Haanas was voted the #1 wilderness park destination in North America by National Geographic,” you tell your quizzical friends. “It’s sort of like the Canadian Galapagos,” you try again. But they don’t quite get why you are so moved by these tiny islands scattered off the coast of British Columbia. And really, you don’t blame them. It’s impossible to understand until you have experienced the transformative wonder of this place firsthand.  

For a kayaker like yourself, this little corner of the earth is something of a paradise. Paddling through Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve is an experience unlike any other. You drift through Haida First Nation waterways, passing ancient totem poles that dot the distance. Black bears mosey between the towering trees, while sea lions and slick seals flop at the water’s edge. Here, you are one with the water, and your day is spent upon the surface of the sea – 4-5 hours of paddling each day, gliding through these exquisite, untouched shorelines. The silence is heavy, and heavenly.

At night, when you rest in a tent cast upon the mossy rainforest floor, you can feel the thrum and pulse of this vast, magical place. It is deep, and sure, and in perfect sync with your own wild, happy, heart.

Please scroll down for the August 27 – September 3, 2018 itinerary description (Northern Route)

August 20-27, 2018: Southern Route (Rose Harbour to Burnaby Island)  

ARRIVAL: AUGUST 19

You will need to arrive in Sandspit the day before the trip departs. At 7:00 PM there is a meet and greet where you will have the opportunity to meet your group and Wild Women guides at Moresby Explorers’ office, next to the Seaport B&B. At the meeting your guides provide you with an overview of the trip, provide a national park orientation, distribute dry bags to pack your gear, and answer any last minute questions you may have.

DAY 1: GETTING THERE

You are picked up at your Sandspit accommodation around 7:30 AM by van. You’ll travel over logging roads for about one hour to Moresby Camp where you board an open zodiac for 3-4 hours of an exhilarating boat ride into the park. Upon arrival at your first remote campsite, you set up camp and have a kayak and safety orientation. After lunch you have a chance to try out the kayaks for the first time, exploring the waters surrounding home for the night.

DAY 2 – 7: THE JOURNEY

On this route you’ll get a chance to experience the energy and wildlife (e.g., Stellar sea lions, tufted puffins, common murres, rhinoceros auklets) of the open Pacific Ocean and the opportunity to explore the remnants of the old whaling station at Rose Harbour.

Your journey also includes an exploration of the intertidal life at Burnaby Narrows as well as a visit to the greatest number of standing mortuary poles at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of SGang Gwaay Llnagaay (Ninstints Village on Anthony Island).

Your kayaking route will depend on potential wildlife sightings, weather, sea conditions, and abilities of the group.

Day 8: BEFORE YOU LEAVE

On the last day of the kayak tour, you have time to reminisce about the previous days over breakfast. The zodiac generally arrives about midday for the journey back to Sandspit where you have the opportunity to get together with the rest of your group for a farewell dinner.

You will return to Sandspit late in the afternoon. Please note that due to weather or other unforeseen circumstances it is possible you may arrive back later than planned. For this reason you should plan to stay in Sandspit the last night of the trip so you are not rushing to try and catch flights or ferries.

 

August 27 – September 3, 2018: Northern Route (Burnaby Island to Tanu)

ARRIVAL: AUGUST 26

You will need to arrive in Sandspit the day before the trip departs. At 7:00 PM there is a meet and greet where you will have the opportunity to meet your group and Wild Women guides at Moresby Explorers’ office, next to the Seaport B&B. At the meeting your guides provide you with an overview of the trip, provide a national park orientation, distribute dry bags to pack your gear, and answer any last minute questions you may have.

DAY 1: GETTING THERE

You are picked up at your accommodation at approximately 7:30 AM by van. We travel over logging roads for about one hour to Moresby Camp where we then board an open zodiac for a 2-3 hour exhilarating ride into the park. Upon arrival at your first remote campsite, you’ll set up camp and have a kayak and safety orientation. After lunch you can try out the kayaks for the first time, exploring the waters surrounding home for the night.

DAY 2 – 7: THE JOURNEY

The tour starts on Burnaby Island, approximately mid-way down the Gwaii Haanas National Park, where you will aim to visit Burnaby Narrows, known for its rich concentration of intertidal life. Paddle north from there to cross Juan Perez Sound to visit the hot springs at Gandll K’in Gwaay.yaay for a welcome soak. The surrounding bays and inlets provide plenty of great wildlife viewing opportunities and great beaches for camping.

If weather conditions allow, you’ll then travel along the eastern shore of Lyell Island to Hlk’yah GaawGa (Windy Bay), where the Legacy Pole was erected in 2013. The north end of the park provides numerous kayaking routes to choose from, from the open water of Hecate Strait to more sheltered inner waters. Towards the end of the trip, you’ll visit the Haida cultural site of T’aanuu Llnagaay (Tanu).

Your kayaking route depends on possible wildlife sightings, weather, sea conditions, and abilities of the group.

DAY 8: BEFORE YOU LEAVE

On the last day of the kayak tour, you have time to reminisce about the previous days over a leisurely breakfast. The zodiac generally arrives about midday for the journey back to Sandspit where you have the opportunity to get together with the rest of your group for a farewell dinner.

You will return to Sandspit late in the afternoon on the last day of your trip. Please note that due to weather or other unforeseen circumstances it is possible you may arrive back later than planned. For this reason you should plan to stay in Sandspit the last night of the trip so you are not rushing to try and catch flights or ferries.

Click here to see upcoming trip dates to book your spot!