Greenland and Wild Labrador

About the Experience

If your to-do checklist includes polar bears, icebergs, learning the Greenland Polka, birding nirvana, tromping around national parks, Norse and Inuit history—our Greenland to Wild Labrador Adventure is designed just for you. Right down to the cup of fragrant Labrador tea (and we’ve included a few mummies for good measure)! 

Nature and Inuit heritage are celebrated in our passage through the unspoiled fjords and remote coastal communities of Greenland to the skinny Narrows of St. John’s, Newfoundland.

In partnership with our friends at Adventure Canada, Wild Women is offering an exclusive series of small ship expeditions to Arctic destinations on the impressive Ocean Endeavour. Together, we share a deep love for discovery, learning, environmentally-sensitive travel and sustainability. 

Hike and explore historic sites like the abandoned Moravian Mission in Hebron. Visit communities in Greenland, northern Labrador and eastern Newfoundland and experience the true heartbeat of the land–the people who live there. Take advantage of the extreme birding and wildlife opps from the vantage point of a  Zodiac. Relax and unwind or get wound up!

Your voyage will be coloured with thoughtful discussions, expert interpretation and the adrenalin found in seeing unfamiliar places. The landscape delivers rolling, ever-changing visuals: Inuit hamlets, saw-toothed mountains, glacier-scraped fjords, string bogs, stands of black spruce and indigo waters. 

We’ll Zodiac along the sheer face of a Greenlandic glacier and cruise among icebergs; feel the beat of the local music and dance (yes, Greenland Polka is a thing!); decide between Arctic char, redfish, lumpfish or capelin and learn a few words (torrak! *That’s “awesome” in Greenlandic). Be sure to ask about the kaffemic tradition—no spoilers here! You’ll be glad you did.

We’ll cross the Arctic Circle by ship via the bewildering Søndre Strømfjord. We’ll hike and Zodiac among the burning fall colours of Torngat Mountains National Park. 

On the final leg of our journey, we’ll experience the Viking vibe at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of L’Anse aux Meadows. With your Wild Women Viking-in-training crew, we’ll be back in the Narrows all too soon with expanded hearts. Are you coming?

 Check out the webinar on our Greenland To Wild Labrador Adventure, but prepare to be instantly smitten and ready to polka.

 

 

 

Did you know we’re a global leader in women’s adventure travel? Check out our destinations around the world!

 

 

 

 

Click here to see the full itinerary!
Greenland and Wild Labrador

About the Experience

If your to-do checklist includes polar bears, icebergs, learning the Greenland Polka, birding nirvana, tromping around national parks, Norse and Inuit history—our Greenland to Wild Labrador Adventure is designed just for you. Right down to the cup of fragrant Labrador tea (and we’ve included a few mummies for good measure)! 

Nature and Inuit heritage are celebrated in our passage through the unspoiled fjords and remote coastal communities of Greenland to the skinny Narrows of St. John’s, Newfoundland.

In partnership with our friends at Adventure Canada, Wild Women is offering an exclusive series of small ship expeditions to Arctic destinations on the impressive Ocean Endeavour. Together, we share a deep love for discovery, learning, environmentally-sensitive travel and sustainability. 

Hike and explore historic sites like the abandoned Moravian Mission in Hebron. Visit communities in Greenland, northern Labrador and eastern Newfoundland and experience the true heartbeat of the land–the people who live there. Take advantage of the extreme birding and wildlife opps from the vantage point of a  Zodiac. Relax and unwind or get wound up!

Your voyage will be coloured with thoughtful discussions, expert interpretation and the adrenalin found in seeing unfamiliar places. The landscape delivers rolling, ever-changing visuals: Inuit hamlets, saw-toothed mountains, glacier-scraped fjords, string bogs, stands of black spruce and indigo waters. 

We’ll Zodiac along the sheer face of a Greenlandic glacier and cruise among icebergs; feel the beat of the local music and dance (yes, Greenland Polka is a thing!); decide between Arctic char, redfish, lumpfish or capelin and learn a few words (torrak! *That’s “awesome” in Greenlandic). Be sure to ask about the kaffemic tradition—no spoilers here! You’ll be glad you did.

We’ll cross the Arctic Circle by ship via the bewildering Søndre Strømfjord. We’ll hike and Zodiac among the burning fall colours of Torngat Mountains National Park. 

On the final leg of our journey, we’ll experience the Viking vibe at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of L’Anse aux Meadows. With your Wild Women Viking-in-training crew, we’ll be back in the Narrows all too soon with expanded hearts. Are you coming?

 Check out the webinar on our Greenland To Wild Labrador Adventure, but prepare to be instantly smitten and ready to polka.

 

 

 

Did you know we’re a global leader in women’s adventure travel? Check out our destinations around the world!

 

 

 

 

DAY ONE: KANGERLUSSUAQ, GREENLAND

Kangerlussuaq is a former U.S. Air Force base and Greenland’s primary flight hub. Cue up the Top Gun soundtrack, right? Your first lesson begins with the pronunciation of Kangerlussuaq, which is kaˌŋɜˈɬːusːuɑq in Greenlandic (part of the Inuit family of languages spoken by less than 50,000). Maybe you should try on ‘hello’ for size first. “Aluu!” Or, ‘goodbye,’ which is simply “baaj.”

West Greenlandic is the official language that all children learn in addition to Danish and English. Greenlandic words can be extremely long but they often convey an entire sentence. Kind of like a picture saying a thousand words. Fun fact: ‘computer’ is qarasaasiaq in Greenlandic, meaning ‘artificial brain.’

After a few stumbly aluus and a baaj we will be transferred by Zodiac to the Ocean Endeavour. With 168 kilometres of OMG! scenery to stare at, we begin travelling down the longest fjord in the world, Kangerlussuaq Fjord (Søndre Strømfjord), crossing the imaginary but remarkable Arctic Circle as we head southbound.

There’s no need for Netflix with aurora borealis on the reality TV programming schedule. Of course, this kind of magic show can’t be planned or queued up or paused–so, fast forward yourself to the deck and bring your patience and crossed fingers.

 

 

DAY TWO: KANGERLUSSUATSIAQ FJORD

Greenland’s west coast is simply stunning—it’s one big panoramic postcard of superlatives. From daunting mountains to the tiniest sprays of tundra flowers, our stop in this area is one that has everyone stamping their feet in a tantrum when it’s time to leave. The waters are relatively warm here due to the West Greenland Current and the sub-Arctic location but not as warm as the on-board hot tub.

Hikers, birders, poets, photographers, daydreamers and self-proclaimed philosophers will all fall under the coastal spell. You’ve been warned! Later, close your eyes and reflect on the day’s sensory massage in the sauna or hot tub.

 

DAY THREE: NUUK

Nuuk, the buzzy capital of Greenland and largest city is a collision of nature, modernity and the tight embrace of old traditions. The Old Harbor is a reflection of Danish colonial days, while contemporary Nuuk is known for its cool vibe found in minimalist gallery cafes, upmarket Danish steakhouses, boutique shops and rowdy pubs where you may be pulled into a Greenland Polka dance (really!). Consider this your warning!

Did you know that Nuuk is a uni town? The University of Greenland is Greenland’s only university. Most courses are taught in Danish with a few offered in Greenlandic. 

The Greenland National Museum is one of Nuuk’s treasures. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to see the 15th century Qilakitsoq mummies (move over Tutankhamun! There’s a new mummy in town!) and Inuit skin boats. Part of the collection was repatriated from the National Museum of Denmark. 

Mum’s the word if you decide to opt for a beer at Godthaab Bryghus brewery instead. It’s the largest in Greenland and perhaps the only place you might find a pint brewed with the potent local herb, Angelica. The celery-like plant is wholly edible (raw or cooked) with a taste reminiscent of anise, musk and orange. The seeds are used to flavour schnapps, it can be pickled or candied, eaten like celery or enjoyed disguised in a beer (much like zucchini in chocolate zucchini bread!). The brewery also makes a popular ginger-spiced beer. Cheers to that!

 

 

 


DAY
FOUR: DAVIS STRAIGHT

Our engaging onboard presentation series continues as we steam across the Davis Strait towards Canada. The strait splits between southeastern Baffin Island and southwestern Greenland (in case you have a map on your lap and are wondering where the heck you are). Inuit fisherman have relied on these shallow waters for an abundant Arctic char supply. Have you tried char yet? 

Narwhals, bowhead and pilot whales cruise through the Strait in the company of little auks (dovekies) though sightings are always dependent on zooplankton and schools of fish like the Arctic cod. While you may fish for compliments, the auks and whales have another agenda. 

Baffin Bay’s estimated population of 50,000 narwhals accounts for 80 to 90% of the world’s population. The ‘unicorns of the sea’ are playful year-round residents of Baffin Bay, feeding and mating in the winter. Fun fact: the narwhal tusk (most commonly found on males) is actually an enlarged tooth with up to 10 million nerve endings. If they were to promote a toothpaste, it would be Sensodyne! Their tusks can grow to 10 feet in length and some narwhals can have two spiral tusks while others have none!

This is an excellent time to kick back and scout the northern Atlantic for unicorns, auks and other unexpected pop-up wildlife. Find a seat in a workshop, watch a documentary or take advantage of the ship’s amenities! Hang out in the gym or library or bar–there will be wandering Wild Women to keep you company if you want to chat or chill out!

 

 

DAY FIVE-SEVEN: TORNGAT MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK

Canada’s highest peaks east of the Rockies are found in Torngat Mountains National Park, a squeaky new park that opened in 2005–Labrador’s first! The signature saw-tooth skyline is instantly captivating. Denim waters snake through glacier-scraped fjords opening up to the marine highway where icebergs silently glide by like ships.

There are 9,700 square kilometers to hike here though we might not cover them all! The sharp wedge-shaped park sits on continental Canada’s most northerly tip between Northern Québec and the Labrador Sea.

The dramatic subarctic mountains are the homeland of the Inuit of Nunatsiavut, polar bears, black bears and caribou. Birders should be on high alert for red-throated loon, Harlequin duck, peregrine falcon, gyrfalcon, rock ptarmigan, glaucous gull, snow bunting, Lapland longspur and Northern wheatear! (Depending on the time of year and migratory patterns, of course!)

We’ll hike and cruise in the Zodiacs, seeking out birds and bears and visit archaeological sites for the historians in the crew!

 

 

DAY EIGHT: HEBRON

On the northeast coast of Labrador, this haunting site is the surviving remains of a Moravian Mission station. The Hebron Mission National Historic Site of Canada protects the interconnected buildings erected by the Church of the Brethren (the Moravians)in the 1830s. There’s a church, mission house and store, designed in Germanic style with steep, elongated rooflines and small dormer windows. It’s possible that these buildings were pre-fabricated in Germany (IKEA-style). The church’s cupola is a link to the Moravians’ southeast Europe birthplace. The forge, carpenter’s shop and other structures are now left to the imagination.

The Moravian mission was abandoned in 1959, forcing the relocation of the Inuit who resided there. In 2005, Newfoundland & Labrador issued an apology to people affected by the relocations. Former Hebron residents and their kin continue to visit the site and to hunt and fish nearby.

 

 

DAY NINE: NAIN

Nain (population: 1,170) is the most northerly community in Labrador and the administrative capital for the Nunatsiavut Government. Ancient history, even more ancient geology and the Torngat Fish Producers Cooperative (the local Arctic char industry) are powerful forces here. The gateway city  to Torngat Mountains National Park is also home to Voisey’s Bay Nickel Mine and the OKalaKatiget Society, a TV and radio agency that delivers weather updates, vessel reports, kid’s songs, Labrador stories and an Inuktitut language program featuring language lessons and recipes.

The recently built Illusuak Cultural Centre was designed by world-renowned architect Todd Saunders (known for designing the drop-dead-gorgeous Fogo Island Inn). Here, you can step inside an igloo and take another step deep into Inutitut culture through stories and song. We’ll also visit the Moravian Church and learn more about the mission efforts of the Moravians.

Expect the warm embrace of the community, an introduction to the art and carved works of Labrador Inuit and of course, savoury samples of local food and music.

 

 

DAY TEN- TWELVE: THE LABRADOR COAST

Labrador’s coast is untamed, storm-battered and pristine. It’s an open-air gallery of ancient history. From the ship we’ll see the transition in landscape from coastal barrens and high subarctic tundra to high boreal forest, mid-boreal forest and string bog (also known as strong mires). String bogs are defined by slightly elevated ridges and islands with woody plants that alternate with flat, wet sedge mat areas. They appear like oversized terrariums built with spongy moss, lichen, feathermoss, Labrador tea and dwarf black spruce.

Fun fact: the black spruce is the most abundant tree found in Labrador. It’s also featured on the Labrador flag!

Dotted with islands, the area is equal parts raw and fairytale. We’ll select a landing based on each day’s weather conditions.

 

 

DAY THIRTEEN: L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS

L’Anse aux Meadows is the only authenticated Norse settlement in North America and is a celebrated UNESCO World Heritage Site and National Historic site. The archaeological remains of the Norse encampment are over 1,000 years old, making it the oldest known European encampment in North America. It wasn’t until the 1960s that Viking proof was found on the northern peninsula with the discovery of a small bronze cloak pin. Nancy Drew would have had a heyday pulling at the threads of this mystery!

Full-scale replicas of the traditional Norse sod buildings will make you grateful for architecture’s evolution to energy efficient windows and doors. However, it’s awesome to play make-believe and conjure up the sagas of the Viking voyages. Thor, Loki and Eric the Red’s indomitable spirit will impress you. Be sure to climb aboard the Snorri, a replica of the Viking ship that retraced Erickson’s course from Greenland to the Meadows. 

 

 

DAY FOURTEEN: EASTERN NEWFOUNDLAND

The east coast of Newfoundland is known for the dozens of vibrant villages that colour its rugged shores. We’ll find harbour in one of these  communities to truly experience the generosity and flavour of the most easterly province in Canada.

Photographers will exhaust their SD cards and batteries in an attempt to capture the jagged coastlines, secluded island communities and pulse that is exclusive to The Rock. 

Expect a characteristically warm and jolly Newfoundland welcome upon our arrival–there is no other kind! 

 

 

DAY FIFTEEN: ST. JOHN’S

Sailing into the port of St. John’s is a moment that will make you take pause. There is a necessary hush and some sweaty palms at the thought of taking the captain’s wheel to navigate the boat into the famous Narrows.

Watch for locals and tourists alike, madly waving from the iconic Signal Hill just before we slip into the harbour of North America’s oldest city. The carefree and bold paint palette of the houses of The Battery are a pure marvel. Hopefully you will have time to test your quads and climb the hilly streets to see Jellybean Row on foot too. Equally animated, the jumble of rowhouses are no longer defined by one street–the colour pinwheel has become contagious!

We disembark the Ocean Endeavour today with heavy but full hearts. We will say our farewells (and when next?). Rest assured, the expedition team will be on hand to assist you with luggage and transportation arrangements.

We hope you can squeeze in a Screech ceremony to make your landing in Newfoundland 100% official! It’s a Wild Women prerequisite! For everyone who is a “come-from-away” there’s a full, unspoken guarantee that you’ll be back.

 

 

 

OCEAN ENDEAVOUR

The Ocean Endeavour is an opulent 137-metre (450-feet), 198-passenger ice-strengthened vessel with twenty Zodiacs, advanced navigation equipment and stabilizers. A doctor, paramedic and medical clinic offer complete peace of mind. The ship has several lounge areas, a library (Compass Room) and multiple viewing decks to totally chill out by yourself or with your newfound crew!

 

 

MAP

 

Click here to see upcoming trip dates to book your spot!
Cabin Category 10, Suite, Deck 7 Forward-Facing

  • Forward-facing picture windows, unobstructed view
  • Matrimonial bed (bigger than US double but smaller than a Queen)
  • Private bath with full tub
  • Refrigerator
  • Approximately 310 square feet

Cabin Category 9, Junior Suite, Deck 5

  • Picture windows, unobstructed view
  • Matrimonial bed (bigger than US double but smaller than a Queen)
  • Private bath
  • Sitting area
  • Approximately 270 square feet

Cabin Category 9, Junior Suite, Deck 7 Forward-Facing

  • Forward-facing picture windows, unobstructed view
  • Matrimonial bed (bigger than US double but smaller than a Queen)
  • Private bath with full tub
  • Sitting area
  • Refrigerator
  • Approximately 290 square feet

Cabin Category 8, Superior Twin, Deck 5 $13,245USD

  • Two picture windows, unobstructed view
  • Two lower berths
  • Private bath
  • Sitting area
  • Approximately 210 square feet

Cabin Category 8, Superior Twin, Deck 7 Forward-Facing $13,245USD

  • Forward-facing picture windows, unobstructed view
  • Matrimonial bed (bigger than US double but smaller than a Queen)
  • Private bath with full tub
  • Approximately 180 square feet

Cabin Category 8, Superior Twin, Deck 7 $13,245USD

  • Picture windows, partial obstruction
  • Matrimonial bed (bigger than US double but smaller than a Queen)
  • Private bath
  • Refrigerator
  • Approximately 190 square feet

Cabin Category 7, Select Twin, Deck 5 $12,395USD

  • Picture windows, unobstructed view
  • Two lower berths
  • Private bath
  • Approximately 190 square feet

Cabin Category 7, Select Twin, Deck 8 $12,395USD

  • Oversize windows, partial obstruction
  • Matrimonial bed (bigger than US double but smaller than a Queen)
  • Private bath
  • Refrigerator
  • Approximately 145 square feet

Cabin Category 6, Comfort Twin, Deck 4 $11,645USD

  • Two porthole windows, unobstructed view
  • Two lower berths
  • Private bath
  • Approximately 175 square feet

Cabin Category 6, Comfort Twin, Deck 7 $11,645USD

  • Picture windows, partial obstruction
  • Two lower berths
  • Private bath
  • Refrigerator
  • Approximately 135 square feet

Cabin Category 6, Comfort Twin, Deck 8 $11,645USD

  • Picture windows, obstructed view
  • Matrimonial bed (bigger than US double but smaller than a Queen)
  • Private bath
  • Refrigerator
  • Approximately 160 square feet

Cabin Category 5, Main Twin, Deck 5 $10,695USD

  • Picture windows, unobstructed view
  • Two lower berths
  • Private bath
  • Approximately 115 square feet

Cabin Category 4, Exterior Twin, Deck 4 $9845USD

  • Porthole window, unobstructed view
  • Two lower berths
  • Private bath
  • Approximately 100 square feet

Cabin Category 3, Interior Twin, Deck 5 $8745USD

  • Interior cabin
  • Two lower berths
  • Private bath
  • Approximately 120 square feet

Cabin Category 2, Triple, Deck 4 $7645USD

  • Interior cabin
  • Three lower berths
  • Two private baths
  • Approximately 200 square feet

Cabin Category 1, Quad, Deck 4

  • Interior cabin
  • Four lower berths
  • Private bath
  • Approximately 240 square feet