Icebergs and Arts Adventure

About the Experience

Here, the dramatic arctic, boreal and temperate landscapes collide abruptly in one province. Humpbacks, caribou, moose, martens, puffins and black bears surprise those who patiently linger and scan the expanses. 

Experience the jagged, Atlantic-battered east coast in the most authentic way by staying in winsome cottages hugged by the wilds of Gros Morne National Park.

Recharge on rambles along glacier-scraped fjords, walk atop the tiptop of the earth’s mantle and download the serenity of the sheltered bays. The terrain visibly shifts at every turn from volcanic rock shores to the desert-like Tablelands and coastal lowlands teeming with seabirds. Gros Morne, a coveted summit in the Long Range Mountains, is an immersive playground for those who love to hike and be put under the spell of the wild.

Wild Women’s Newfoundland: Icebergs and Arts adventure will take you to the northern peninsula’s remote and staggering coastline where 10,000-year-old icebergs slide by, as though in a parade. In the village of Conche, equal awe will be found in seeing the 200-foot-long tapestry embroidered by local women artisans, depicting the colourful history of the French Shore. 

On this trip, you will also stay in the cozy luxury of a Scandinavian-style wilderness lodge on the banks of Tuckamore Pond. There’s an opportunity to totally reboot as the property has a wood-fired sauna, hot tub and untamed Newfoundland wilderness and spruce forest at its doorstep.

Rocky headlands rise to incredible heights. Tiny, resilient outport communities dot the sheltered coves like a handmade miniature village. This isolation has preserved cultural traditions and lifestyles in a remarkable way. This east coast experience is as sweet as Jam Jams (soft molasses and jam cookies) and Figgy Duff (a steamed pudding and Jigg’s Dinner centrepiece!). Bag two UNESCO World Heritage Sites (Gros Morne and L’Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site), spot whales, follow in the ghostly shadows of Vikings, chase icebergs and drink an Iceberg beer on this signature Wild Women itinerary.

 

Click here to see the full itinerary!
Icebergs and Arts Adventure

About the Experience

Here, the dramatic arctic, boreal and temperate landscapes collide abruptly in one province. Humpbacks, caribou, moose, martens, puffins and black bears surprise those who patiently linger and scan the expanses. 

Experience the jagged, Atlantic-battered east coast in the most authentic way by staying in winsome cottages hugged by the wilds of Gros Morne National Park.

Recharge on rambles along glacier-scraped fjords, walk atop the tiptop of the earth’s mantle and download the serenity of the sheltered bays. The terrain visibly shifts at every turn from volcanic rock shores to the desert-like Tablelands and coastal lowlands teeming with seabirds. Gros Morne, a coveted summit in the Long Range Mountains, is an immersive playground for those who love to hike and be put under the spell of the wild.

Wild Women’s Newfoundland: Icebergs and Arts adventure will take you to the northern peninsula’s remote and staggering coastline where 10,000-year-old icebergs slide by, as though in a parade. In the village of Conche, equal awe will be found in seeing the 200-foot-long tapestry embroidered by local women artisans, depicting the colourful history of the French Shore. 

On this trip, you will also stay in the cozy luxury of a Scandinavian-style wilderness lodge on the banks of Tuckamore Pond. There’s an opportunity to totally reboot as the property has a wood-fired sauna, hot tub and untamed Newfoundland wilderness and spruce forest at its doorstep.

Rocky headlands rise to incredible heights. Tiny, resilient outport communities dot the sheltered coves like a handmade miniature village. This isolation has preserved cultural traditions and lifestyles in a remarkable way. This east coast experience is as sweet as Jam Jams (soft molasses and jam cookies) and Figgy Duff (a steamed pudding and Jigg’s Dinner centrepiece!). Bag two UNESCO World Heritage Sites (Gros Morne and L’Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site), spot whales, follow in the ghostly shadows of Vikings, chase icebergs and drink an Iceberg beer on this signature Wild Women itinerary.

 

DAY ONE: WELCOME TO THE ROCK

Meet your expert Wild Women guide and fellow group members at Deer Lake Airport at 2:30pm. We will travel one hour north into the giant wonder of Gros Morne National Park. We’ll swap stories over our first dinner together in Woody Point followed by a trip orientation that should answer all your burning questions.

 

DAY TWO: HIKING IN SOUTHERN GROS MORNE

First stop: the Discovery Centre! Here we will learn more about the geological and natural wonder of Gros Morne. We will spend a full day hiking through the uninhabited regions of the rugged Long Range Mountains. Rising abruptly from the narrow coastal lowlands, these storied mountains dominate the park. We’ll learn about the hardy wildflowers, tundra terrain, bogs and windblown ‘tuckamore’. These seemingly stunted, gnarly-rooted evergreen trees are synonymous with Newfoundland. They grow  totally sideways thanks to the constant push of the strong ocean winds. 

You’ll hike on the famed Tablelands, one of the most unexpected features of the park that led to Gros Morne being designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Resembling the sandstone and dry creek beds of Arizona, the Tablelands are one of the only places in the world where the Earth’s mantle is exposed. These barren, bald mountains are the rusty red carpet attraction on the south side of the park. 

What the heck are the Tablelands? They formed deep in the middle layer of the Earth, in the mantle. As ancient continents collided like bumper cars way back when, it was thrust up and resulted in the peaks of the Appalachian Mountain chain and the supercontinent of Pangea! The eroding mountains and 400 million years of wear and tear are visible in the distinct barren orange expanse–the mantle!

This evening we’ll head to the small rural fishing village of Trout River for dinner (possibly trout?) at a beachside restaurant loved by locals.

 

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DAY THREE: SEA KAYAKING ON BONNE BAY

We will explore the biodiverse marine environment in the sheltered fjord of Bonne Bay by tandem sea kayak today. Minke whales, eagles, kingfishers, common terns, Arctic terns and Caspian terns are regular visitors. Don’t worry–you’ll soon learn how to distinguish the terns and turning a kayak too!

Optional activities for the afternoon include visiting the art studios and artisan shops in historic Woody Point, walking a stretch of the local seaside trail or simply recharging with a coffee and  something sweet (Jam Jams?) while overlooking the panoramic bay.

 

DAY FOUR: WESTERN BROOK POND AND HEADING NORTH

It will be an early start today as we depart Woody Point and drive to the northern end of the park to experience the inland fjord on Western Brook Pond. We’ll follow the main 2.7km gravel and boardwalk trail to the departure point of the Western Brook Pond boat tour. On the boat, we’ll relax and absorb the views of stunning cliffs and plummeting waterfalls of this ancient fjord. We’ll then stretch our hamstrings before a four-hour scenic coastal drive up the Northern Peninsula to the four-star luxury of an internationally-renowned hunting and fishing lodge. At Tuckamore Lodge, we will have a free evening to soak in the hot tub and sweat it out in the lakeside sauna!

 

DAY FIVE: THE CONCHE TAPESTRY

Today we will visit the twee fishing village of Conche. Several women fibre artists collaborated in this effort and created a monumental tapestry depicting the history of the French Shore. At the gallery, artist and museum curator, Joan Simmonds, will share her experience and knowledge of this iconic project with the Wild Women. 

Afterwards, we will gather for a traditional Newfoundland “dinner” (a.k.a. lunch) and compare tasting notes! Expect fresh cod au gratin, salad and can’t-resist-pass-the-butter homemade bread. The afternoon can be spent hiking along the Conche Peninsula, visiting the village’s cute shops or lingering at the local museum. 

We will return to the Tuckamore Lodge, satiated by a day rich in sensory experiences. Tonight’s only itinerary? Relaxing around the warmth and crackle of the fire.

 

DAY SIX: ICEBERGS AND VIKINGS

We’ll travel to the “Iceberg Capital of the World”–St. Anthony! Located on the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula, St. Anthony is home to 2,500 residents (with a regional population upwards of 25,000), and curiously, one mounted polar bear in the local municipal building. 

Here, we’ll take in the pure magic of the iceberg and whale-watching boat tour along the capelin-rich coastline that serves as a magnet for the whales. Humpbacks, minkes, orcas and fin whales are commonly seen in these waters as well as nesting colonies of eiders and kittiwakes. 

From late May to early July, 10,000-year-old icebergs, growlers and “bergy bits” make their way south via “Iceberg Alley” from the Arctic and western Greenland. We can commemorate this migration with a genuine Iceberg beer from Quidi Vidi Brewing Company. 

Fun fact: St. Anthony’s annual Grenfell Ride is a snowmobile touring event that is featured in the Guinness World Records as the “longest chain of snowmobiles travelling together.”

Not-so-fun-fact: In 1912, just 400 miles from Newfoundland, an iceberg led to the demise of the grand Titanic.

After successfully filling memory cards with whale spouts and bergy bits, we’ll travel further north to L’Anse Aux Meadows, another UNESCO-designated site, to explore the remains of an 11th-century Viking settlement. The excavated remains of wood-framed, peat-turf buildings are similar to those found in Norse Greenland and Iceland–ghostly evidence of the first European presence in North America!

 

DAY SEVEN: ALONG THE NORTHERN PENINSULA

We will leave the enormity of the Great Northern Peninsula and make our way south. En route, we will visit Port aux Choix National Historic Site and take a guided hike out to Philips Garden. The ancient remains are one of the largest Dorset Paleo-Eskimo settlements in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. 

Or, depending on the group’s interest, perhaps we’ll spend our time  combing the limestone barrens and shoreline for fossils and rare, endemic plants like barrens willow–a species restricted to a 30km stretch of the coastline along the Strait of Belle Isle) and the flowering alpine-Arctic Fernald’s braya and taller Long’s braya.

In the afternoon, we’ll stop to check out the photogenic sea arches in Arches Provincial Park and the rocky beach for beachcombing surprises. Tonight, we will have some big laughs and reflect on all we’ve seen over a farewell dinner in Rocky Harbour where we’ll be spending the night. Last call for Iceberg beers!

 

DAY EIGHT: DEPARTURE DAY

This morning, you are a free range chicken! Explore Rocky Harbour (the largest community in Gros Morne National Park) at your leisure. There are several craft shops offering a selection of 100% wool sweaters, mitts, jams and jellies, quilts, antler carvings, folk art and stained glass.

Or, take in that relentless briny breeze and poke around the beaches and easily accessible viewpoints from the wharfs. 

We’ll return to Deer Lake Airport late in the morning for hugs and departures. Sigh. Where next?

 

 

 

Click here to see upcoming trip dates to book your spot!