Peru Horseback Riding Tour

About the Experience

This journey into the sacred surroundings and verdant valleys of the Incas will revitalize your spirit. Ride into the Valle Sagrado (the famed ‘Sacred Valley’) along ancient trails in the shadows of monumental mountains and history. Yes, there will be roaming llamas and alpacas too! Let’s not forget the loyal company of a Peruvian Paso horse too!

This immersive cultural expedition in the Peruvian Andes is a route that’s designed for confident beginner riders and more advanced. More experienced riders will appreciate the terrain and smooth ride of the gaited Paso horse.

Our Peru Horseback Riding Tour begins in the beating heart of Cusco where we’ll hear stories of the Incan culture’s evolution and resiliency. This beautifully balanced itinerary of mountain village visits, Incan ruins and six rewarding days of highland horseback riding along secret sections of the Inca Trail offers the best of all worlds.

We’ll visit otherworldly places like the salt pans of Maras, the surreal circular terraces of Moray and unwind in the natural hot springs sandwiched between mountains. Expect to explore the stone streets, temples and colonial squares of Ollantaytambo, known as the “Living Inca City”. Peru Horseback Riding Tour: It’s culture, it’s nature, all rolled into one tidy package. We’ll also have the opportunity to experience a genuine “earth oven” lunch: the “Pachamanca.”  

Our accommodations are equally balanced in beauty from cozy B&B’s to rural tourism cooperatives like the Inka Lodges to mountain huts operated by families in small villages.

The pinnacle moment is on the ninth day, when we reach the monumental marvel of Machu Picchu by train, the most famous historical site in all of South America.

This unmatched trip is led by effervescent horsewoman and explorer Kyd Campbell. Born in Canada, Kyd has been under the spell of Peruvian highlands magic for nearly 10 years. Her team includes Paola Miyahira, a native Quechua-speaking mountain guide and developer of community-based tourism.

With Kyd and Paola’s reliable guidance, the surefooted, gaited Peruvian Paso horses and tall Andean saddle mules will introduce us to the most remarkable and remote parts of the ancient Inka Trail.

Our Peru Horseback Riding Tour is an awesome combo of backcountry riding, startling archaeological sites, lively markets, Peruvian cuisine experiences, and educational moments that cover everything from alpaca husbandry, weaving, medicinal plants, straw thatched roofing, and Andean potato production!

If you like a little of this and that, this trip has been curated just for you.

 

 

Click here to see the full itinerary!
Peru Horseback Riding Tour

About the Experience

This journey into the sacred surroundings and verdant valleys of the Incas will revitalize your spirit. Ride into the Valle Sagrado (the famed ‘Sacred Valley’) along ancient trails in the shadows of monumental mountains and history. Yes, there will be roaming llamas and alpacas too! Let’s not forget the loyal company of a Peruvian Paso horse too!

This immersive cultural expedition in the Peruvian Andes is a route that’s designed for confident beginner riders and more advanced. More experienced riders will appreciate the terrain and smooth ride of the gaited Paso horse.

Our Peru Horseback Riding Tour begins in the beating heart of Cusco where we’ll hear stories of the Incan culture’s evolution and resiliency. This beautifully balanced itinerary of mountain village visits, Incan ruins and six rewarding days of highland horseback riding along secret sections of the Inca Trail offers the best of all worlds.

We’ll visit otherworldly places like the salt pans of Maras, the surreal circular terraces of Moray and unwind in the natural hot springs sandwiched between mountains. Expect to explore the stone streets, temples and colonial squares of Ollantaytambo, known as the “Living Inca City”. Peru Horseback Riding Tour: It’s culture, it’s nature, all rolled into one tidy package. We’ll also have the opportunity to experience a genuine “earth oven” lunch: the “Pachamanca.”  

Our accommodations are equally balanced in beauty from cozy B&B’s to rural tourism cooperatives like the Inka Lodges to mountain huts operated by families in small villages.

The pinnacle moment is on the ninth day, when we reach the monumental marvel of Machu Picchu by train, the most famous historical site in all of South America.

This unmatched trip is led by effervescent horsewoman and explorer Kyd Campbell. Born in Canada, Kyd has been under the spell of Peruvian highlands magic for nearly 10 years. Her team includes Paola Miyahira, a native Quechua-speaking mountain guide and developer of community-based tourism.

With Kyd and Paola’s reliable guidance, the surefooted, gaited Peruvian Paso horses and tall Andean saddle mules will introduce us to the most remarkable and remote parts of the ancient Inka Trail.

Our Peru Horseback Riding Tour is an awesome combo of backcountry riding, startling archaeological sites, lively markets, Peruvian cuisine experiences, and educational moments that cover everything from alpaca husbandry, weaving, medicinal plants, straw thatched roofing, and Andean potato production!

If you like a little of this and that, this trip has been curated just for you.

 

 

 

DAY ONE: CUSCO CITY HISTORIC TOUR

Arrive in Cusco, the historic heartland and former capital of the Incan Empire. We’ll immerse ourselves immediately with a colourful city and historical tour that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the ancient and mystical Incan culture.

We’ll first visit the Sacsayhuaman Incan Temple on the northern outskirts of the city. This enormous structure overlooks the city of Cusco and the ancient Lego-like construction of perfectly snug rocks is unbelievable. It’s believed that 10,000 to 20,000 workers extracted the stones from the nearby quarries and moved them 20 kilometers (12 miles) to this hill. Today, it’s believed that Sacsayhuaman retains only 40 percent of its original structure. Despite this assumption, the physical feat and engineering is a pure marvel.

We’ll also visit the Qoricancha Cathedral (also referred to as Coricancha and Cusco’s “Golden Temple”), a sacred site dedicated to Inti, the Sun God, Inti. Qoricancha was impressively built in perfect alignment with stellar and planetary motion and this synchronicity allows for a direct stream of sunlight to enter through its windows every solstice during the Festival of the Sun (Inti Raymi).

In the evening, we will enjoy a culinary experience that will introduce us to authentic Andean flavours! Our hotel, Andean Wings Boutique, is a classic in Cusco, an old, cozy casona.

Meals Included: Dinner
Tonight’s Sweet Sleep: Andean Wings Boutique
The skinny: 

  • Highest Point: 3,400m/11,155ft
  • Soundtrack: “Up Where We Belong” by Joe Cocker and Jennifer Warnes

 

DAY TWO: CHINCERO & SACRED VALLEY

In the morning, we’ll make our way up to the verdant plains that will take us towards the Sacred Valley of the Incas. En route, we will visit the small town of Chincheros and its ruins, megalithic rocks and Inca architecture. Chincheros actually sits higher than Cusco in elevation and is associated with its Peruvian weaving production. We will visit the family home of Augusta Puma Pumacahua Pumallalli, who supports a collective of women weavers, for a detailed textile workshop to learn more about this intergenerational tradition and the textiles we will see all along our journey.

At lunch time, we will drive down to the village of Urubamba where we will visit the ranch and meet our horses. Get ready to cook! Together, we will prepare a typical and incredible “Pachamanca” lunch cooked on hot rocks. Pachamanca translates to “earth oven” in Quechua language. This meal was traditionally a special occasion celebration with elaborate rituals. Chicken, lamb, alpaca and sometimes even guinea pig are cooked on hot stones arranged in a pit dug into the earth. Bright Andean potatoes, sweet potato and habas (green fave beans) are layered according to cooking times then covered in fragrant herbs, an organic cloth and earth. Depending on the size of the meal being prepared, it can be ready in 40-50 minutes.

Tonight we’ll stay at the Andean Wings’ Sacred Valley lodge. Take a wander in the gardens to absorb bird songs and mountain views. We might be lucky enough to spot a giant hummingbird too! This species is the largest of the hummingbird family–they have a wingspan of 21.5 cm (8.4 inches)!

We will enjoy a light dinner at the lodge and receive our saddle bags to get packed for the morning.

Sleep long and well–we’ll get ready to ride out in the morning!

Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Tonight’s Sweet Sleep: Andean Wings Boutique
The skinny:

  • Highest Point: 3,762m/12,342ft

 


DAY THREE: RIDE TO MARAS SALT FLATS & MISMINAY

After breakfast, we will be picked up by van at 8:30am to head to the ranch. On this first day of riding, we’ll follow the serpentine Urubamba river which is an integral part of the Amazon drainage system. It rises in the Andes of south Peru and follows an unstoppable 725 km (450 mile) course. We’ll pass pre-Incan tombs and colonial farm houses, viewing traditional adobe homes, still inhabited.

The Inca considered this river to be sacred and it was vital to maize production and irrigation systems that were established in the fertile valley.

After an hour, we’ll ascend from the belly of the Sacred Valley of the Incas (2,885 m / 9,465 ft) and pass through the Pichingoto Canyon up to the otherworldly Maras Salt Flats.

Here, we’ll have the opportunity to visit the site of pre-Incan salt production that is still in operation today. We’ll enjoy a divine picnic (pass the salt!) near an old hacienda on Maras plain and reach the community of Misminay (3800 m / 12,467 ft) in the late afternoon.

In the village, we’ll learn about powerful native medicinal plants and a little ethnobotany 101. The multipurpose nature of plants continue to provide healing, food, dyes, fibers, oils, resins, and soaps, for the locals here and around the world.

We’ll gather for a traditional dinner before retiring to unique guesthouses within family homes collectively run by an association of local families in the village.

Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Tonight’s Sweet Sleep: Local Family Guesthouse in Misminay
The skinny:

  • Riding Difficulty: Moderate (city and country riding)
  • Highest Point: 3,800m/12,467ft
  • Total Distance: 15 km/9.3 miles (5 hours)

DAY FOUR: RIDE TO MORAY & PACHAR

This morning, we’ll begin our ride at 9AM to the panoramic lookout of the Moray Inkan Agricultural Laboratory. We’ll learn about the origin and development of the edible potato and highland farming.

The Moray circular terraces are enormous designs that were built by the Incas with a complex irrigation system for each agricultural laboratory with the goal of developing functional agriculture for this arid, high Andean region. Each circular terrace was used to simulate different altitudes, for testing to cultivate and acclimatize thousands of types of vegetables and crops such as potatoes, corn, quinoa, kiwicha, winter and summer squash and coca.

Later, we’ll ride across the vast expanse of the pastoral region of Maras with a chance to canter towards the glaciers, for those who wish to, and down the Paucarbamba Canyon. On our descent, we’ll have a scenic picnic lunch, taking in valley views and glaciers and after lunch we will return to the Urubamba river.

When we reach the Andean village of Pachar (2792m/9,160ft), we will stable our horses for the night at a riverside B&B.

Tonight we will chill out in the cozy guesthouse and have gourmet pizza made in an adobe clay oven by our host, Tony. It’s so still here that we will be able to hear the comforting sound of our horses munching in the garden as we rest for the night.

Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Tonight’s Sweet Sleep: Casa de La Chola
The skinny:

  • Riding Difficulty: Moderate to strenuous 
  • Highest Point: 3,737m/12,260ft
  • Total Distance: 23.3km/14.5 miles (7.5 hours approx.)

 

DAY FIVE: OLLANTAYTAMBO INKAN TEMPLE

Following breakfast, we will ride along the river, past the watchtowers called Chokana and arrive at the town and archeological zone at Ollantaytambo. We will ride through town and up to las Qolqas Ecolodge, stabling the horses, and then head to town for lunch.

After lunch at Apu Veronica, one of the valley’s go-to favorites, we’ll visit the fabled Temple of the Sun with our historic guide and visit the exquisite stone streets of the town and the artisan market.

General Ollanta built this town to impress his Nusta princess and the history is well conserved in a bowl-shaped valley with narrow fortress entrances.

On the mountains that surround the town, we’ll be able to see General Ollanta’s granaries and ceremonial grounds. When an earthquake weakened the town’s impenetrability, the Spanish overtook this essential portal to the jungle. They built colonial-style buildings on top of the original Incan foundations which results in the particular architectural hybrid juxtaposition that remains intact today.

The town buzzes like a beehive as excited travelers converge here before the last monumental leg of their journey to the ancient citadel of Machu Picchu.

We will have dinner, a whole workshop about native food, at the famed “Chuncho” in the plaza. When we get back to the lodge we’ll relax in our deluxe canvas cabins for the night. Tomorrow, we’ll be riding out!

Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Tonight’s Sweet Sleep: Las Qolgas Eco Resort
The skinny:

Highest point: 2,792m/9,161ft

Fun fact: The Kingda Ka at Six Flags Great Adventure in Jackson, New Jersey, is the tallest roller coaster in the world. It reaches breathtaking heights of up to 139m (456 feet). You’ll be rollercoaster-ready after this trip!

 

DAY SIX: PUMAMARKA & PATACANCHA

Getting our Paso horses ready early, we will ride upwards, above the town of Ollantaytambo and ascend part of the fabled Inca Trail until we reach the ancient outpost of Pumamarka. We’ll ride through the intricate Incan farming site and terraces called “The thousand steps”, that are still farmed today.

Lunch will be a typical Peruvian “caldo “soup” but totally atypical as we’ll be in a glass cabin with panoramic views! Following lunch, we’ll ride up the river to Patacancha (3,700 m / 12,139 ft), where we’ll stay in the Patacancha Lodge, a family run rural tourism project.

Here, we’ll rest with the Quispe Huaman family. Patacancha is a native Andean community that maintains a lifestyle said to be “as close to that of the Incas.” The family has worked in cultural based tourism for over a decade and offers dynamic workshops exploring the roots of their culture and beliefs. Get ready for a warm reception!

Dinner will be of classic Andean flavours and staples, with chef Gabriel’s exquisite touch. Tonight’s stay will be in a mountain hut with private bathrooms.

Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Tonight’s Sweet Sleep: Patacancha Lodge
The skinny:

  • Riding Difficulty: Moderate to strenuous 
  • Highest Point: 3,977m/13,048ft
  • Total Distance: 19.7 km/12.2 miles (7.5 hours approx.)

 

DAY SEVEN: IPSAY HIGH PASS TO HUACAHUASI

After breakfast, the Quispe Huaman family will teach us about planting with hand tools and hand spinning grass ropes for making traditional thatched roofs.

After acquiring our new skills we will strike off on a full day of riding that will take us over the high pass called Ipsay (4,450 m / 14,600 ft) to the tiny village of Huacahuasi (3750 m / 12,303 ft), where potato farming and alpaca husbandry are sutured into the locals livelihood. Prepare for all types of weather!

On the way, we’ll enjoy a sumptuous lunch of local trout and stuffed potatoes prepared by Vicente and his family in a stone mountain house overlooking the magical Ipsay lake. We’ll travel though alpaca farming areas and observe how the multiple water sources (waterfalls, rivers and the daily cloud of mist) influence life in the mountain village and how the water feeds down to the Sacred Valley.

Tonight, we’ll stay at Huacahuasi Lodge, another successful rural tourism project operated by 3 generations of local women. This rustic lodge offers private bathrooms and cozy comforts while maintaining the authenticity of mountain family life and an epic panoramic view. This is a feel-good stay as it is very rare for Andean women to independently create their own hospitality business. They have received extensive training in hosting, cooking and cultural presentation. Our visit offers them the opportunity to stay tightly knit together, prosper at home, preserve and share their culture in a rewarding way. The women have designed special “horse” motifs on their textiles, especially for us!

Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Tonight’s Sweet Sleep: Huacahuasi Lodge
The skinny:

  • Riding Difficulty: Moderate to strenuous 
  • Highest Point: 4,450m/14,600ft
  • Total Distance: 11 km/6.8 miles (4.5 hours approx.)

 

 

DAY EIGHT: LARES HIGHLANDS 

This is our final day of riding! We’ll begin with a ride down from Huacahuasi past undulating fields, crossing a river, directing our faithful horses towards the highland community of Tambolaylla to refuel with a traditional lunch in a family home and a final opportunity to collect some intricate textiles.

Following lunch, we’ll continue our descent into Lares which is famous for its natural thermal springs. The natural springs have been enjoyed by travellers, for a millennia. Pre-Columbian civilizations knew of their medicinal properties long ago and the view from the valley cradled between two mountains is the best backdrop to unwind in.

We’ll say goodbye to our loyal horses and enjoy a long soak in the hot springs before our shuttle arrives (the drive is approximately 3 hours).

Our next stop and perfect sleep will be back at Las Qolqas Eco Resort in Ollantaytambo.

Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Tonight’s Sweet Sleep: Las Qolqas Eco Resort
The skinny:

  • Riding Difficulty: Moderate 
  • Highest point: 3,817m/12,523ft
  • Total Distance: 13.5km/8.4 miles (2 hours approx.)
  • Driving time 75km/46.6 miles (3 hours approx.)

 

 

DAY NINE: MACHU PICCHU 

On this enigmatic final day of our Wild Women journey, we will reach the crescendo: Machu Picchu. We’ll rise early drive to the station and board the train to reach this magnetic site. The famed ‘Lost City of the Incas’ is an ancient marvel of stone palaces, towers, temples and staircases.

Our expert guides will lead us to the most intimate views of this famous archaeological zone, with several stops to learn about how the Incas lived, loved, thrived and connected with the landscape.

Machu Picchu is located 2,430 m (7,972 ft) above sea level, in the middle of a tropical mountain forest. In 1911, American academic and explorer Hiram Bingham stumbled upon its remains. What a stumble it was! The remains are an incredible urban creation of the Inca Empire at its height.

Culminating our experience along the Inca trail, we will take a moment to celebrate our group’s camaraderie, efforts and newfound kinship.

Star struck and mesmerized by Machu Picchu, we’ll travel back to Ollantaytambo on the iconic blue train, where our van will be waiting to whisk us back to Cusco, arriving back at Andean Wings Boutique Hotel l for dinner and a much deserved rest.

Tonight’s only agenda is to relax, reminisce and share laughs and stories at the hotel over well-deserved pisco sours or classic fluorescent yellow Inca Kolas.

Fun fact: In 1935, an enterprising young English couple named Martha and José Lindley decided to produce a unique drink to commemorate Lima’s 400th year anniversary and their new homeland. Marketed as the “Pride of Peru”, their sweet Inca Kola is legendary and a must-try.

Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Tonight’s Sweet Sleep: Andean Wings Boutique
The skinny:

  • Trekking Details: Moderate and marvelous
  • Highest point: 2,710m/ 8,891 feet
  • Total Hiking: 5 hours (give or take a few selfies)

 

DAY TEN: ONWARDS 

We’ll have a filling breakfast at our hotel before taking a shuttle onwards to the airport (or your next destination). Prepare for lingering hugs, the sharp pangs of saying goodbye to newfound friends and that niggling question, where next?

Meals included: Breakfast

Click here to see upcoming trip dates to book your spot!

Wild Women Expeditions and our local partners intend to adhere to the described itinerary. This is only a general guide to follow on your tour of the region. Our itineraries are subject to change, as we cannot predict the weather or other environmental conditions. We are continually striving to make improvements to all our trips based on feedback from Wild Women members, guides, partners, and other research. We reserve the right to alter itineraries based on the above at any time.

Arrival into Peru
All international flights arrive via Lima and you must catch a connecting flight to Cusco. There are daily internal flights to and from Cusco via Lima, Arequipa and small jungle airstrips in the Amazon basin.
Arrival into Cusco:
Fly into Alejandro Velasco Astete International Airport (CUZ) anytime before the rendezvous time.
We recommend that you arrive at least a day or two before the start of your trip to acclimate to the altitude in Cusco. Andean Wings Boutique, where we start our trip, is in the heart of the city. You’ll likely run into other wild women there doing the same thing, and you can plan ahead via the private Facebook group you’ll be invited to join a few months before the trip starts.Group Rendezvous Point

 

Notes about Pick-Up

There is a pre-arranged taxi pickup (included) from the airport in Cusco up to 48 hours before the tour start. Look for a driver holding a sign with your name outside of the airport doors. If you arrive prior to 48 hours, please arrange your own transportation to your pre-trip hotel. Taxis are available outside the airport and the cost is approximately $15 – $20 USD from the airport to the city centre, cash only. You can pay in USD or Soles. Those wishing to arrive on their own should meet up at the hotel by 1:30 PM. Our city tour begins at 2:00 PM.



Departure from Cusco, Peru

  • Airport transfers are included, within 48 hours of the end of the trip, and will be provided in conjunction with your departing flights.
  • If you are staying on longer, please arrange your own transportation to the airport.
  • Accommodations are not included on this night, so be sure you book this before the trip if you’re planning to stay longer.

 

Drop-Off Point:

  • Date: Day 10
  • Time: In conjunction with your flight
  • Location: Alejandro Velasco Astete International Airport (CUZ)


You are responsible for booking your own flights or other transport arrangements to the trip start location. These arrangements and any other independent arrangements that you may make are not a part of the trip booked with Wild Women Expeditions and are entirely at your own risk. Wild Women Expeditions accepts no responsibility, directly or indirectly, for any loss, damage or injury to property or person in connection with such arrangements. Should you require assistance with your travel arrangements, please contact:Megan and Zale | ****Now Boarding Travel SpecialistEmail: wildwomen@nowboarding.travelNote: Now Boarding Travel only provides services of 3-star quality or greater. For budget alternatives, please refer to the Lonely Planet guide for your destination.Important: For international and remote destinations, there is always the risk of flight delays, baggage delays and flight schedule changes which may cause late arrivals, which may, in return, result in you missing the group tour departure. For these reasons, we encourage you to consider arriving a day early, which will also help you overcome any jet lag from traveling!
During the trip: Your main luggage will be transferred by vehicle each day to your accommodations. The same vehicle will meet you for lunch most days, in case you need to access your luggage mid-day. You will have saddle bags for carrying what you need while riding (water, rain gear, etc.).

You are fully responsible for your own visa requirements, permits, and certificates for your trip. It is the sole prerogative of each country or region to determine who is allowed to enter. It is your responsibility to check with the country’s Consulate and your country’s travel website such as Canada’s for up-to-date information about traveling internationally.

  • Passport

Most countries and airlines recommend passports be valid for at least six months beyond the date of your expected return to your home country. Before you leave, ask your transportation company about its requirements related to passport validity, which may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Important: A copy of your passport must be emailed to the Wild Women Expeditions office by 130-days pre-trip.

 

  • Visa

Most visitors can stay for up to 90 days without a visa. Check via:

Peru Visa – Application, Requirements – Residents of Canada | VisaHQ

 

Note: As fees and policies can change, we highly recommend that you contact your local embassy or consulate for the most up-to-date visa requirements, or see your travel agent.


We work with a small, dedicated crew on our horseback trips in Peru and we come into contact with many local families. Our main guide and crew take care of tipping the local families and restaurants, but you are also welcome to contribute if you wish to.Note: Tips can be given in USD or Soles.Our crew uses a point system to fairly distribute tips. They unanimously have chosen for all tips to be gathered together and distributed based on this system. On the morning of Day 10, there is an informal tipping ceremony. Someone in the Wild Women group should take the lead on collecting the tips and present the guides with the tip envelope. The team will make sure each crew member receives their tips.

  • Rooming Arrangements

Our trip prices are based on a twin share (minimum two women per room/tent), so we’ll team you up with another solo wild woman to share with if you’re on your own, or of course you can share with your travel partner. No single rooms are available on this adventure.

  • Potable Water

It is not advised to drink tap the water. Potable water is provided throughout the tour.

 

If you would like to join Wild Women Expeditions in its commitment to reducing single-use plastic, you can travel prepared with your own water treatment system!

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One of the greatest attractions to our trips is the wildlife we may encounter while riding, hiking, or in transit along mountain roads and highways. Our guides are well versed in the areas we visit, the habits of the local wildlife, and livestock such as llama, alpaca and vizcacha. Please keep in mind that wildlife is just that, wild, and we cannot guarantee any wildlife sightings.When we encounter wildlife or livestock, we have some basic rules that must be followed to ensure that the animal is not adversely affected by our presence. The main goal when viewing any wildlife or free-ranging livestock is not to disturb their normal activities. Your guides may instruct you to stay close together as a group when viewing any wildlife and position the group appropriately to minimize any disturbance to the wildlife. Feeding wild animals or free-ranging livestock is strictly forbidden. There are provincial and federal laws that can result in fines and/or jail terms for feeding wildlife. At your pre-trip meeting, your guides will review our approach to wildlife viewing.

Peru is located in an active seismic zone and is prone to earthquakes. The Cusco region is luckily not prone to strong earthquakes. If you are indoors when an earthquake strikes, make your way to a safe zone. These are usually marked in public buildings with an “S”, which indicate where the structural pillars are located. If you are outside, keep away from buildings and other areas where objects could fall.

There are two types of electrical outlets in Peru. One accepts two-pronged plugs with flat, parallel blades, while the other take plugs with two or three round prongs. Many Peruvian electrical outlets are designed to accept both types. Electricity in Peru is 220 Volts and 60 Hertz (cycles per second).

Please note: Electrical outlets are available in all accommodations, though in some of the more remote village stays, there will be a limited number of outlets to be shared.


Peru is on Eastern Standard Time, 5 hours behind GMT (Greenwich Mean Time). Peru does not observe daylight savings time.


Predatory wildlife in the high Andean region consists mainly of local dogs, but also take care not to approach any pigs (who will eat anything that you leave outside, including boots, rucksacks and plastic garbage bags). Biting flies are sometimes seen near the river areas, hotsprings and at Machu Picchu. A good insect repellent, and sting relief are a necessity. On the trail, we will see many alpaca and llama, who may kick or spit. Please adopt frequent hand washing protocols when touching animals, including dogs and horses as they may carry bacteria and parasites that can quickly affect our digestive systems.

Wild Women Expeditions recommends that each participant should bring enough cash in local currency or available credit/debit funds to cover their meals during travel to and from their destination. Please consider your own spending habits when it comes to allowing for drinks, meals not included in the trip package, shopping, etc., and we also suggest you have access to emergency funds. As we learn in detail about traditional Peruvian textiles, you may wish to purchase textiles directly from the artisans at different points along the trail, in cash (SOL or USD).

  • Currency Exchange Offices & Banks

Peru’s official currency is the Nuevo Sol (SOL), divided into 100 cents. There are 5,10,20 and 50 cents coins and S/. 10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 banknotes.

Please check online for current exchange rates. Wild Women Expeditions likes XE Currency Converter

We highly suggest you read this article: Where to Exchange Currency Without Paying Huge Fees for more information about this for your trip.

  • Banking

Peruvian soles are welcome at most shops, restaurants and artisan markets. Exchange offices in the cities change US dollars to soles. There are only a few bureau de change in Lima and Cusco that will exchange currencies other than US dollars. Very old, torn or damaged notes are usually rejected.

In Cusco, you can change your US dollars in the money exchange offices or banks located in the first two blocks of Avenida el Sol and generally, they offer a favorable exchange rate. They previously agree on the daily rate among them so you do not need to negotiate. Avoid money changers on the street, as they may carry counterfeit currency or work with pickpockets.

Banks are open from Monday to Friday from 9:00 to 6:00 PM, and Saturdays until midday. There are street moneychangers on the corners of Avenida el Sol as well as many ATMs.

  • Credit Cards

Credit cards are widely accepted in Lima, and in some shops in Cusco, but less so outside major cities. In small towns, automated banking machines (ABMs) may not be readily available or may be out of money. It is better to plan ahead and carry Peruvian soles with you in small denominations. ABMs accept international credit and debit cards. Some tourist establishments accept the main credit cards, including Visa, Master Card, Diners and American Express. The use of traveller’s checks may be restricted. Ask the individual establishment if they are accepted. When using a credit card, make sure you are charged the right amount for your purchase. Visa is the most widely accepted card in Peru.

Please note that there might be a difference between the official currency exchange rate in Peru and the exchange rate that the credit card companies charge.

  • Goods and Services Taxes

A general sales tax (IGV) is added automatically to most consumer bills (19%). Restaurants and hotels add a 10% service fee.

  • Budgeting

Here is a general guide of what you can expect to pay in Peru for a few common items in Nuevos Soles (S/.)

  • Set lunches: less than $10 USD; supermarkets have takeout.
  • Multi-course lunch at mid-range restaurant: $ 13 USD.
  • Fine restaurant dinner: from $22 USD.

Please be sure to provide complete, accurate, and up-to-date information about your health & fitness level and keep us updated if there are changes. Wild Women Expeditions trips travel to remote areas where limited or no sophisticated medical facilities exist.A medical emergency situation is extremely unlikely; however, should it arise we need to be prepared with the necessary information to help you.Important Note: If you choose not to disclose a condition, infirmity, injury, or ailment herein and are subsequently deemed to be unfit for expedition travel due in whole or in part to such condition, infirmity, injury or ailment, Wild Women Expeditions guides, and partners shall have the right to remove you from the trip with no refund or compensation payable. Any evacuation expenses incurred are payable by the evacuee via their Medical Travel Insurance or personal expense.Generally, our expeditions are intended for travelers in reasonably good health for their safety, along with that of their fellow travelers.Wild Women Expeditions recommends that in the months leading up to your adventure, you prepare yourself by walking often on various types of terrain and exercising regularly to increase your level of fitness with cardio and/or weight training.As there are some water-based activities on this itinerary, please notify Wild Women Expeditions if you are a non-swimmer.Getting FitYou don’t have to be a professional athlete to enjoy your Wild Women expedition. Not by a long shot! You’ll be surprised at what you can achieve with our experienced guides at your side and a little camaraderie.

That said, you’ll definitely enjoy yourself far more if you do some preparation so your body is conditioned and ready to enjoy and make the most of the outdoors.

 

Here are a few ideas to help you get ready:

  • Ride!

You will be spending many hours each day with your bum in a saddle, so please ensure you get some riding in before this trip. While this trip is rated “novice (comfortable at walk and trot)”, we do recommend that you have some familiarity with horses, being around them and riding, at least a little bit, to make it a more comfortable and enjoyable adventure.

  • Work your Core.

Keeping good posture and balance on a horse requires a strong core, especially when going up and down steep trails. Doing pilates, or a balanced (focused on strength as well as flexibility) yoga program, can be a great way to prepare for this trip.

  • Take every opportunity you can to be active.

You can improve your fitness a lot just by adopting some new habits; take the stairs at work, go for a walk at lunchtime, park your car away from work and walk. Aim for 30 minutes a day and keep a diary so you can look back on it and feel proud. These may sound trivial but they’re all building blocks!

  • Join a local walking or running group.

This is a great way to get fit and you’ll also see new places, meet great people… and make them all jealous when they find out what you’re about to go on your travels.

  • Warm up, cool down and stretch.

If you’re doing a workout then make sure you start and finish gently and stretch any tight muscles – this will help you avoid any aches, pains and pulled muscles. If you’re a member of a gym try some yoga, tai chi or pilates classes to build up your flexibility, stability and balance.

  • Hydration.

When you suddenly ask your body to walk or be active, it needs a bit more fuel than it needs when, say, sitting at a desk all day! The main thing your body needs is water, so stay hydrated and practice sipping water often. Getting a water bottle or hydration bladder is a great way to make sure you have it on hand at all times. Make a habit out of taking a bottle of water with you wherever you go.

  • Nutrition.

Eating little and often will keep your body well fuelled for outdoor exercise, especially food like nuts, dried fruit and bread. The odd bit of chocolate and a few boiled lollies are good for keeping your blood sugar levels up while you’re hiking as well!

  • Have fun!

The most important point of all! You are about to embark on the trip of a lifetime. You’re going to meet some amazing people, see some wonderful places and create memories that will stay with you for life. The more prepared you are to tackle the various challenges, the more fun you will have. Also, with all the endorphins you create from all this training, you’ll be smiling from ear to ear! It’s a great way to boost your happy vibes.

  • For more information on getting fit!

Check out our blog, Getting Fit: For a Horseback Riding Trip, which includes a 20 minute workout video specifically aimed at preparing the muscles you’ll need for riding.


For general Wild Women Expeditions FAQs please click here.